artist interview

Interview with Artist Graeme Jukes

by
Daulton Dickey.

Slope 01`08`17 a (1)I came across Graeme Jukes’s mixed media on Ello. The images immediately arrested me. Steeped in early 20th century avant-garde movements, especially the Dadaists, his art expressed a nightmarish yet strangely familiar quality—the kind of familiarity you intuit, unable to articulate.

Captivated by his imagery, I decided to ask him about his work, his inspirations, and his need to create.

Your work seems paradoxical in that it rejects aesthetics while establishing one—or, the very least, coherence; the illusion of one. Is this conscious on your part?

Rejecting aesthetics? Possibly rejecting conventional aesthetics but I think it is part of a well-established Dadaist aesthetic. I don`t really think about it that much, I do what feels natural and as such it is not a conscious decision on my part. Paradoxical is good, however—I like that.

How did you settle on collage and mixed media? 

Look To The Sky 30`01`15 aThat was largely accidental. I discovered collage back in the 1980s and decided to try my hand. I did thirteen collages and then abandoned the idea, turning to oil painting instead. These early collages are not on Ello.co but can be seen on my DeviantArt site

I gave up on art altogether in the 1990s, destroying most of my work. In 2012 I became seriously ill with cancer. That brush with mortality made me determined that if I survived I would start making art again. I was given the all clear early in 2014. Around the same time I discovered the collages I had done thirty years earlier, which had somehow survived the 90s immolation. Simultaneously there was a major exhibition of the work of Hannah Hoch at the Whitechapel Gallery. I was absolutely bowled over by the beauty and the absurdity of her collages so I decided to have another go myself. Initially the work had a retro-scifi-popart feel before turning darker and more dada. (more…)

An Interview with Artist Kelly Kyv

by
Daulton Dickey.

Kelly Kyv is an artist whose works you won’t see plastered in magazines or online—to the detriment of lovers of strange, quirky, absurdist art.

Now a resident of Greece, she was born and raised in Canada, where she received a degree in graphic arts. Her passion for art seemed to choose the course her life took. In 1989, shortly after graduating college, she entered and won a competition resulting in four of her illustrations appearing as Christmas seals for the Canadian Lung Association.

She took an extended hiatus from art to raise four kids. But now she’s back. “Eventually, I got back into creating my art,” she told me, “which is mainly for myself—but I am looking into selling [it] soon.”

Let’s start with the basics: when did you start to draw?

I started drawing and doodling daily at the age of 10 or 11. However, I do have a specific memory from grade one. I remember I was very frustrated while doing a test because I didn’t know many of the answers. On the last page, I was asked to draw something and I really surprised myself that I could draw on demand. That was the only part of the test that lifted my spirits. (more…)